21
Jul
aspiringdoctoruk:

I don’t think that you can say that any one career in the medical profession is more worthy than another.A major factor that first encouraged me to look into healthcare as a career was the way that EVERYONE works together as a team, rather than having an obvious hierarchy, and all working towards the main goal of helping the patient.

Very true. Sometimes the system works and sometimes it doesn’t. You are only as strong as your weakest member of the team!

aspiringdoctoruk:

I don’t think that you can say that any one career in the medical profession is more worthy than another.
A major factor that first encouraged me to look into healthcare as a career was the way that EVERYONE works together as a team, rather than having an obvious hierarchy, and all working towards the main goal of helping the patient.

Very true. Sometimes the system works and sometimes it doesn’t. You are only as strong as your weakest member of the team!

(Source: adenosinetriesphosphate)

19
Jul
Nurses tend to recall with sharp intensity the roller coaster of support they received during their first year, after graduation; Memories of the nurses who threw them to the wolves, and reflections of the nurses who unfailingly came to their rescue without question. These images remain consistent, and set the bar for mentoring new graduates, in addition to cultivating how we work as a team - and a powerful reminder of how imperative it is to not only be supported, but to also be a steadfast supporter.
— Nurse X (via dancingnurse-ed)

If you had a bad experience with a nurse mentor—change the cycle don’t repeat it!!

17
Jul

Pimp Answers 

princeton-medbloro:

The EKG changes associated with pulmonary embolism are:

  • S1Q3T3 (the classic test answer)
    • a prominent S wave in lead I
    • a Q wave and inverted T wave in lead III
  • sinus tachycardia (MOST COMMON)
  • T wave inversion in leads V1 - V3
  • Right Bundle Branch Block
15
Jul

The Beauty of the First Year of Nursing 

I’ve recently spent quite a significant amount of time reflecting on my experience thus far as a nurse. Sequestered to the couch due to injury the last few months, I’m left spending hours thinking about favorite moments, connecting with patients, bonding with coworkers, feeling like I was living my dream.

As I exited my first year on the floor and eased into my sophmore year, I had better nights brought on by a heightened confidence, increased knowledge, and better relationships with my physicians and nurses. I began to realize though, that I had a harder time connecting with those who mattered the most — my patients.

My loyal followers will remember this crisis of connection I experienced earlier this year. Without the bonds with my patients, it was harder to endure the long hours and feel a sense of purpose in my work. I noticed that I started to get more cynical, get grumpier with the needy patients, roll my eyes with those frequent flyers refusing all meds but the dilaudid. The little old lady who wanted nothing more than to tell me all about her grandchildren was felt as a time suck and inconvenience rather than a blessing and opportunity to build rapport.

I didn’t realize until this time off that I was becoming one of those jaded nurses I had vowed not to turn into. But why?

I have thought about it quite a bit. It took me some time to figure it all out, but I think I have it nailed down.

In the first year, as I’ve discussed many times, exists a transition period from a world of protected academia to the realm of nursing and all the responsibilities that come with it. I was afraid to come to work, afraid to get off the elevator. I constantly worried about screwing up medications, missing the signs of a deteriorating patient, charting late, leaving too many things for the next shift, getting in trouble with the higher ups, etc. I was afraid and I didn’t want to be there. This in many ways bound me to my patients who also were afraid and didn’t particularly want to be there either. We were struggling together. They taught me and I taught them. We each breathed a sigh of relief when I went home and they were discharged—we had both made it.

Once the struggle diminished, I was less empathetic. Maybe this is where jaded and cynicism begins. Regardless of that, it won’t continue. Everything that happens to us is for a reason, to teach us something, an opportunity to learn. While I’m miserable being at home and feeling out of touch with the career I’m in love with, I know that it’s for a reason.

When I return I won’t forget my struggle or theirs, and remember to stay present with each of my patients. Hopefully it won’t take another injury for me to remember the heart of my job as a nurse.

15
Jul
pgonzrom:

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

This Bus Is Transforming The Lives Of The Homeless

BY SCOTT KEYES

Most of us have suffered through the frustration of needing to quickly get ready for work, only to have to wait for a roommate to finish his shower. Now imagine having to share that shower with not one or two other people, but hundreds.
That’s precisely the situation facing San Francisco’s estimated6,436homeless residents, who currently have just seven places in the city where they can shower.
Motivated by the belief that everyone has the right to be clean, Doniece Sandoval foundedLavaMae, a non-profit with an innovative idea: take old, unused city buses and retrofit them with fully functioning showers for homeless people to use. Last weekend, LavaMae, a play on the Spanish word for “wash me,” launched its first mobile bus.
“Our buses were designed in consultation with homeless people,” Sandoval told ThinkProgress, a process that has taken over a year.
The interior of one of LavaMae’s mobile shower buses
CREDIT: KENA FRANK

For example, many homeless women expressed concern for their safety and privacy while showering. As a result, Sandoval and her team designed two individual shower pods in each bus, one of which is accessible for persons with disabilities.
Each pod includes not only a shower, but also a toilet, sink, and a space to temporarily store one’s things. Each bus will permit around 30 people to shower on a given day. Once all four buses are running, Sandoval estimates they will be able to provide more than 2,000 showers per week. (See more photos of the buses and interiorhere.)
“We’re mobile because we want to reach people where they are,” Sandoval said. In addition, “If we built a brick-and-mortar concept, it would cost a whole lot more.”
The city donated four decommissioned municipal buses to LavaMae and allows the organization to tap into fire hydrants, but retrofitting them with shower pods costs $75,000 per bus.
Funding for the buses comes from a mix of sources. LavaMae raised $58,000 from an Indiegogo campaign, as well as contributions from individuals and small private family foundations. Sandoval and her husband also put a significant amount of their own money into the project.

More at the link.



wonderful!!!

pgonzrom:

goodstuffhappenedtoday:

This Bus Is Transforming The Lives Of The Homeless

BY SCOTT KEYES

Most of us have suffered through the frustration of needing to quickly get ready for work, only to have to wait for a roommate to finish his shower. Now imagine having to share that shower with not one or two other people, but hundreds.

That’s precisely the situation facing San Francisco’s estimated6,436homeless residents, who currently have just seven places in the city where they can shower.

Motivated by the belief that everyone has the right to be clean, Doniece Sandoval foundedLavaMae, a non-profit with an innovative idea: take old, unused city buses and retrofit them with fully functioning showers for homeless people to use. Last weekend, LavaMae, a play on the Spanish word for “wash me,” launched its first mobile bus.

“Our buses were designed in consultation with homeless people,” Sandoval told ThinkProgress, a process that has taken over a year.

The interior of one of LavaMae's mobile shower buses

The interior of one of LavaMae’s mobile shower buses

CREDIT: KENA FRANK

For example, many homeless women expressed concern for their safety and privacy while showering. As a result, Sandoval and her team designed two individual shower pods in each bus, one of which is accessible for persons with disabilities.

Each pod includes not only a shower, but also a toilet, sink, and a space to temporarily store one’s things. Each bus will permit around 30 people to shower on a given day. Once all four buses are running, Sandoval estimates they will be able to provide more than 2,000 showers per week. (See more photos of the buses and interiorhere.)

“We’re mobile because we want to reach people where they are,” Sandoval said. In addition, “If we built a brick-and-mortar concept, it would cost a whole lot more.”

The city donated four decommissioned municipal buses to LavaMae and allows the organization to tap into fire hydrants, but retrofitting them with shower pods costs $75,000 per bus.

Funding for the buses comes from a mix of sources. LavaMae raised $58,000 from an Indiegogo campaign, as well as contributions from individuals and small private family foundations. Sandoval and her husband also put a significant amount of their own money into the project.

More at the link.

wonderful!!!

(via dancingnurse-ed)